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Fourteen Kidney Kars donations on Friday 13th.

    June 13th, 2014

donate the darn car
Friday the 13th may be scary for some of you, but not for the National Kidney Foundation of Utah & Idaho’s Kidney Kars program. Fourteen cars were donated on Friday, June 13th. The car donations came from Salt Lake City, Layton, Provo, Bountiful and as far as St. George. That is nearly $12,000 raised for Utah kidney patients and local Utah medical research in one afternoon!

Edwards, McBride rescue Rivalry for Charity golf tournament

    June 10th, 2014

coach mcbrideEdwards, McBride rescue Rivalry for Charity golf tournament

College football » Whittingham, Mendenhall absent, but annual Rivalry for Charity goes on.

By Jay Drew

| The Salt Lake Tribune
First Published Jun 09 2014 05:25 pm
Last Updated Jun 09 2014 10:40 pm

http://m.sltrib.com/sltrib/mobile3/58047488-219/edwards-utah-football-mcbride.html.csp

Sandy • For the first time since its inception in 1989, the annual Rivalry for Charity golf tournament on Monday pitting teams from the University of Utah and BYU didn’t feature at least one of the head football coaches from those schools.

But the show went on at Hidden Valley Country Club, and so did the laughs, thanks to the former coaches — BYU’s LaVell Edwards and Utah’s Ron McBride — the guys who made the 26th annual event benefitting the National Kidney Foundation of Utah and Idaho what it has become, a staple on the early June calendar for media outlets hungry for sound bites and college football news of any kind.

The foundation’s official position was that Utah coach Kyle Whittingham and BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall couldn’t make it because they were busy conducting youth football camps on their respective campuses. But it has not been a secret that the instate coaching peers have grown weary of appearing at the event, especially Mendenhall, a non-golfer who seemingly always lost to Whittingham because the Ute coach insisted on bringing professional golfers or polished amateurs. Mendenhall brought football players to compete in the four-man scramble format and liked to use it as a bonding experience.

What will happen next year remains to be seen.

The format changed Monday, but longtime friends Edwards and McBride rescued it again, even if their “teams” didn’t face off for the Kidney Cup.

This time, the BYU team featured former football players Hans Olsen, Brian Kehl, Ben Criddle and Carlos Nuno, although Olsen had to leave early for his radio gig and the team’s scorekeeper had to fill in the last few holes. Former Utah quarterback Frank Dolce good-naturedly complained about that rules violation, while admitting that his team didn’t exactly stick to the guidelines either because it had just one other former Ute football player, quarterback Todd Handley. The other two golfers were Andy Waters and Greg Boyce.

“Apparently, Hans Olsen had some cramps and was unable to finish,” Dolce quipped, an obvious reference to LeBron James’ struggles in Game 1 of the NBA Finals.

Naturally, it ended in a tie, with both teams shooting 5-under-par 67s, according to master of ceremonies Rod Zundel, who may or may not have adjusted some scores for dramatic effect.

After it was decided that both teams would have to sing their rivals’ fight song to break the tie, McBride joined the red-clad golfers and crooned a scripted alteration of “Rise and Shout” that included references to the “trail to pain and sorrow” and “my heck is the word if we lose the game tomorrow.”

Edwards joined the former Cougars in singing “Utah Man,” but their scripted account went something like “I am a Utah man, sir, a thought that makes me green … the greenest you’ve ever seen … I’ll be a Utah man until I qualify for the Y.”

When the discussion turned to Olsen having a job in radio, McBride invoked the famous line of former Cougar Lenny Gomes and told Edwards, “At least I’m not pumping your gas.”

Edwards, 83, could afford to smile at that, because he teamed with Derek Roney, Ryan Rice and Richard Watson to win the entire tournament, shooting a 14-under 58. They won TaylorMade drivers and an invitation to play in the Liberty Mutual Invitational at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., next spring.

“We made a lot of 15-foot putts that you don’t normally make, and it came down to the last putter on two or three of them,” Edwards said.

McBride’s team of Bob Mueller, Dennis Ford and Wes Roberts shot a 61.

Asked about his health, Edwards, 83, said he is doing all right but gets tired at times.

“A few holes today, I didn’t play, I just putted. I putted pretty good. They didn’t use my drives, though,” he said, noting that his heart is “good” after undergoing open-heart surgery in December of 2012.

“Now if I had a back and a hip and feet that were better, I would be all right,” the Hall of Fame coach concluded.

drew@sltrib.com

Twitter: @drewjay

BYU legend LaVell Edwards gets one more win at charity golf tournament

    June 10th, 2014

daily hearald

 

http://www.heraldextra.com/sports/college/byu/football/byu-legend-lavell-edwards-gets-one-more-win-at-charity/article_8f7d8ab2-9864-5fc2-b311-59a54a16ae56.html

10 hours ago  •  Jared Lloyd Daily Herald

He hasn’t represented the BYU football team on the gridiron for more than 13 years. He wasn’t even officially representing the Cougars on the golf course Monday at Hidden Valley Country Club.

But in the 26th annual Liberty Mutual Invitational charity golf tournament benefitting the National Kidney Foundation of Utah and Idaho, Hall-of-Famer LaVell Edwards proved that — even at 83-years-young — he still knows how to win.

Yes, that’s right … once again the legendary former Cougar coach led a team to victory.

Edwards was joined by Derek Roney, Ryan Rice and Richard Watson to shoot a 58 in the scramble-format competition, edging out the next two teams by one stroke.

“We had one guy who could hit it a long way and he was very accurate,” Edwards said. “That really helped, but then we made a lot of 10- to 15-foot putts, which you don’t normally make. It came down to the last putter on two or three of them and the guy made them. I think that’s what did it.”

Deen Vetterli, the CEO of the National Kidney Foundation of Utah and Idaho, said it was a spectacular result.

“That was so cool,” Vetterli said. “That was so exciting to have that result.”

In a year where football camps kept BYU’s Bronco Mendenhall and Utah’s Kyle Whittingham from participating, Edwards turned out to once again step up to make the event memorable for the many generous participants.

He just smiled when asked about his contribution on the course.

“I can’t hit it very far now but I made a few putts, which is the only thing I did to help,” Edwards said.

He said he’s still healthy, but he gets tired.

“There were a few holes I didn’t play, but I putted,” he said. “I putted pretty good though. The heart’s good now. If I had a back and hip and feet that were better, that would be all right.”

Vetterli said that in the 26 years that the Kidney Foundation has put on the tournament, no one has done more to ensure its success than Edwards.

“I can’t tell you how important it is for us to have LaVell Edwards with us,” she said. “He has single-handedly helped us achieve the kind of public relations and credibility that we have had since this began. Everyone knows him and he is so gracious and kind. He’s the foundation and the strength of this tournament.”

Vetterli recalled a special event the Kidney Foundation put on 10 or 15 years ago in which they brought in a number of fellow coaches from all over the country to honor Edwards.

“He came up to me after that event and said that if there was anything he could ever do for us, let him know,” Vetterli said. “He’s done it ever since then.”

While Edwards stole the show, BYU and Utah still had teams of (some) former football players officially taking Mendenhall’s and Whittingham’s places representing the schools.

And, as is usual in the “Rivalry for Charity” event, the two teams didn’t see eye-to-eye on how things went.

“You (BYU) don’t have a full squad because Hans Olsen had a cramp issue,” said former Ute quarterback Frank Dolce, who organized the Utah foursome. “And there was an illegal substitution as well.”

Ex-Cougar defensive back Ben Criddle fired back: “We had a substitution, but you have to view this as a little bit of a disqualification. He (Dolce) doesn’t have any former football players on his team. He’s the only football player on that squad and that was the original rule.”

Vetterli said that type of thing is just what the tournament has come to expect.

“When Ron (McBride) and LaVell played, they were always doing wild things,” she said. “We were almost afraid to look. McBride couldn’t believe it when he found out LaVell had won this year. Those two guys are so great, so that was fun.”

The other two BYU representatives turned out to be former Cougar linebacker Bryan Kehl and ex-BYU tight end Carlos Nuño.

The end result Monday was a tie (both foursomes shot a 67) and thus they both ended up “singing” a garbled rendition of the other team’s fight song.

“They were such good sports about it and such nice guys,” Vetterli said. “Several of them came up afterwards and said thanks for the opportunity. It was fun to have them sing those songs, even if you couldn’t understand them.”

Overall, Vetterli estimated that the charity tournament would raise somewhere around $60,000 for the Kidney Foundation to use to help those dealing with kidney disease. She said that she feels fortunate to be able to see those donations turn into life-saving aid.

“I talk to my staff about anyone who gets tired or it gets difficult like any other job,” she said. “But we get five or six letters per week from patients who say, ‘You literally saved my home’ or ‘You literally saved me from having to go on dialysis.’ By far the most fulfilling part of my job is signing those checks that go directly to the patients. That’s the most exciting part to be able to do that because we can really see that we’re making a difference.”

Daily Herald sports editor ​Jared Lloyd can be reached at 801-344-2555 or jlloyd@heraldextra.com. Twitter: @JaredrLloyd. Instagram: @JaredrLloyd.

Rivalry Brews On Golf Course for Kidney Foundation

    June 10th, 2014

fox news

http://fox13now.com/2014/06/09/rivalry-brews-on-golf-course-during-game-between-former-byu-u-football-players/

SANDY, Utah — The rivalry between Utah and BYU was back on the golf course for the Liberty Mutual Invitational at Hidden Valley Country Club, which benefits the Kidney Foundation.

Former Utah quarterback Frank Dolce captained the Utes team against former BYU football players Hans Olsen, Ben Criddle, Bryan Kehl and Carlos Nuno. Both teams made birdies on their final holes to end up tied at the end of the match.

So, both teams had to sing the other school’s fight songs, along with former BYU coach Lavell Edwards and former Utah Coach Ron McBride.

Kidney Foundation Social Worker runs 100 miler from Provo to Salt Lake and back!

    June 4th, 2014

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=30163123&nid=1010

HURRICANE — When Southern Utah resident Cory Reese heads out for a run, he isn’t training for a 5k, 10k or even a marathon. Reese, known to many as “Fast Cory,” runs 100-mile races and is about to embark on his 10th 100-miler. This time, however, he will be doing it solo and unsupported.

A husband, father of three and social worker, Reese has a unique reason for running: for the pure enjoyment of it. And although extremely ambitious, Reese didn’t start out by running 100-mile races.

“For a long time I thought a marathon was the peak of human endurance. Then I came across guys like Davy Crockett and Ed Ettinghousen who were doing crazy distance running (and making it look easy). It really opened my eyes to the fact that we really are capable of so much more than we know,” Reese said.

Completing his first 100-mile race in 2011, Reese was hooked, going on to complete eight more races, four of them in 2014 alone.

“I’ve treated the last year or so kind of like an experiment in pushing myself to see how much I am capable of,” Reese said. “I’ve tried to push the limits and really challenge myself.”

Realizing that he’s run a 100-miler in February, March, April and May, Reese thought he’d continue the streak one more month.

“I figured out that I’ve run nine 100-milers, and I wanted No. 10 to be something different, challenging and interesting,” he said. “Then I had an idea. How about running through the heart of Utah? Start at the state capitol building, run to Provo 50 miles away, and then turn around and run back.”

Enlarge image
“I figured out that I’ve run nine 100-milers, and I wanted No. 10 to be something different, challenging and interesting. Then I had an idea. How about running through the heart of Utah? Start at the state capitol building, run to Provo 50 miles away, and then turn around and run back!” -Cory Reese

Planning to start the morning of June 4 and carrying all his own gear and fuel, Reese will rely solely on himself and a steady stream of gas stations along the way to refill his water and buy food. “I’ve always been a fan of densely packed calories, with a particular fondness for Hostess products,” Reese admitted. “So just for fun, and just because they’ll be available, I’ll plan to eat a steady stream of Hostess along the way to get the calories needed to run that far.”

And with that, the ultra-runner deemed his upcoming run, the “Hostess 100.”

In a note to readers of his blog, Reese wrote, “I think it’s important in life to take risks. Challenge yourself. Do something that scares you. Go big or go home. Try something that will either be an epic adventure or a miserable failure. That’s what this run is to me. I’m excited to see how things turn out.”

To follow Cory’s progress and other adventures, go to fastcory.com

Student who hears our Kids and Kidneys Presentation to Donate Kidney

    May 30th, 2014

 Hi there!

I had your 8th grade health class  last year and heard the Kids and Kidneys presentation.

You’re probably wondering why I am emailing you out of the blue. It’s not to see if you remember ME out of thousands of students but rather, I just thought you might be interested to know that your class has changed my life, and hopefully is about to change someone else’s. Ever since your Kidney Organ Donation activity I have been so interested in Organ Donation and have always wanted to be able to donate.

When I was younger I thought the only way was to hope that donation after death would be a possibility for me. As I got older, I realized living donation is something I would be willing to do for someone I loved. I secretly wanted to know someone, who knew someone that needed a donation. Earlier this year, I realized that I do not need to wait for someone I know to become sick, as I researched ‘Good Samaritan’ donors.

I have now “applied” for  Good Samaritan donation through YES Utah. I have undergone a medical history evaluation for living kidney donation to a person in need. I have my first testing appointment today, and will continue to test to find a match. I’m am beyond excited for this. To be able to improve someone’s quality of life like this would be a dream come true. My fingers are crossed that I will for sure be able to be a donor, without problems.

I just wanted to let  you know that without your class I would have not considered this to the extent it took. I wouldn’t have been nearly as interested, and it wouldn’t have been something I always think about. Thank you for your inspiration.

Sincerely,

K. Young

U of U Hospital Live Tweets Kidney Transplant

    May 21st, 2014

 

U of U tweeting kidney transplanthttp://www.ksl.com/?sid=29977199&nid=148&title=u-hospital-live-tweets-kidney-transplant&s_cid=queue-4

https://twitter.com/UofUHealthCare  #Transplant #uofuKT #livingdonor #donatelife

SALT LAKE CITY — Deannie Wimmer interviews the surgical director of living donor at the University Hospital about the decision to live tweet a kidney transplant.

“It’s good to educate people that live donation for kidney transplant is very safe,” said Dr. Jeff Campsen. “And if we can show that this is something that we can do routinely and we do well and we do safely, and they can follow the exact steps of that, it’s a good way to educate people in Utah on how we do this.”

Campsen also talks about the the thousands of people nationwide who are waiting for a kidney transplant and the impact of a live transplant donation.

Click the video above to watch the full interview.
Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=29977199#r0u6zHOoFYzPlCmK.99

Haircuts in American Fork to benfit Local Kidney Transplant family

    April 25th, 2014

 

Relik

Need a haircut in American Fork this Saturday?

When:   Saturday April 26th from 5-9 pm
 Where:   Relik Salon and Spa,  61 W Main Street American Fork Utah

What:     Relik Salon in American Fork is holding a cut-a-thon.

Why:      ‘Free’ haircuts “With Donation.” All funds will be given to a local family struggling paying back medical debt after a kidney transplant.

Contact Mallory:      malmalfrog@yahoo.com / 801-372-2973

 

 

 

Curious about becoming a Kidney Donor? Or donating a Kidney Kar/Car in Utah or Idaho for a tax deduction?

    April 16th, 2014

http://www.yesutah.org/donations/kidney.php

yes utah

The Living Kidney Donation Program

Both adults and children suffer from kidney failure and are now, or will soon be, in need of a transplant. People in need have been receiving transplants from family and friends and from deceased donors for many years, but there aren’t enough kidneys to help everyone. In order to increase the kidneys available for transplant and to lessen the suffering of those waiting, Intermountain Donor Services (IDS) and the area’s transplant centers have formed the Living Kidney Donation Program to increase the number of kidneys available for transplant. 

 

Good Samaritan Living Kidney Donation

Good Samaritan donors are living donors who do not know the recipient, but make their donation purely out of selfless motives. This type of donation is also referred to as anonymous or non-directed donation. Recipients are those at the top of the local wait list. 

 

Kidney Paired Donation

A paired donation consists of two donors who are incompatible with their intended recipients. The two recipients swap donors so that each can receive a compatible kidney. Once the evaluations of all donors and recipients are completed, the two donations and transplants are scheduled simultaneously. 

 

Kidney List donation

Kidney list donation can result when a live donor is incompatible with the intended recipient, and so donates to the wait list. In return, the intended recipient receives priority and advances on the wait list, receiving a kidney much more quickly; often the next available appropriate kidney. 

 

How do I know if I can be a living donor?

Any healthy individual who has two kidneys and who is between the ages of 21 and 65 can potentially donate one kidney. In order to determine elegibility, a person must undergo a health evaluation and counseling. A medical history, physical examination, and a number of blood and urine tests are performed to determine health. Blood type, which must be compatible with that of the recipient, is also determined. Counseling is provided to ensure that every person considering kidney donation understands the surgery, the risks involved, and the recovery period. 

 

Can I live with one kidney?

Almost everyone is born with two kidneys. After donating a kidney, a person can live a normal, long and healthy life. The remaining kidney grows bigger and simply takes over for both kidneys. 

 

What are the risks?

No surgery is without risk. However, living kidney donation is very safe for healthy individuals. Nearly fifty years of research show that kidney donors have a normal life expectancy and lead normal lives. Extensive testing is done to ensure that kidney donation carries a minimal risk for potential donors. Some of the possible risks associated with any surgery are:

Bleeding
Infection
Pneumonia
Blood clotting
Reactions to anesthesia

The risk of dying from any surgical complication is extremely small (perhaps two in 10,000). All potential donors will have the opportunity to discuss these risks with the surgical team performing the operation. 

 

Life-long considerations

Donating a kidney does not increase the risk of future health problems or decrease life expectancy. However, every living donor should be aware that if something happens to the one remaining kidney, such as a severe traumatic injury or cancer, then kidney function could be compromised. 

 

How long will the surgery take?

Typically, the preparation and the surgery itself take four to six hours. After recovering from anesthesia, donors can go to their hospital rooms. Although every donor is different, recovery should be uneventful. Feeling tired is an expected reaction to the surgery and anesthetic. There is pain lasting from a few days to several weeks as the muscles around the incision heal. Pain medications are prescribed and taken as necessary. The discomfort gradually decreases as the incision heals and physical activity is resumed. 

 

Time and resources

It is common to take two to six weeks off from work to recover from surgery. IDS and the transplant programs provide no compensation for this time lost. Potential donors should contact their employers to see if paid leave would be provided for this absence. 

 

Who pays for the donor’s medical evaluation, surgery, hospitalization and follow-up care?

Medicare or the recipient’s insurance pays for all medical costs for the donor’s medical evaluation, surgery, hospitalization, anesthesia, doctor’s fees, and follow-up care. However, all other costs, such as transportation and time lost from work, are not typically reimbursed. 

 

Why living donation?

Patients who need kidney transplants have always been encouraged to find their living donors, usually a relative or close friend. The success rate is better and the waiting time is shorter than for cadaver kidneys (kidneys from people who have died). However, due to medical, personal or matching issues, sometimes it is not possible for family or friends to donate. There is often a long waiting time and ultimately not enough cadaver kidneys to provide for everyone in need. Living Kidney donation increases the number of kidneys available to those waiting for transplants. With enough Living Kidney donors, the waiting list for kidney transplants could be completely eliminated. 

For more information on kidney donation, please contact us at
livingdonations@yesutah.org.

 

Becoming a Living Kidney Donor

Step 1: Review all the material about living kidney donation found at this website.

Step 2: Contact IDS byemail or phone (801-521-1755) to express interest in kidney donation.

Step 3: Complete and return a medical/social history form. Once the form has been returned to IDS, you will be asked to meet with a donation coordinator to discuss the process of donation in more detail.

Step 4: After making the decision to donate a kidney, you will be referred to one of the area’s transplant centers, LDS Hospital or University of Utah Hospital, for a thorough evaluation.

Step 5: Medical and psychological evaluations will be completed, and you will be matched with a recipient. Your donor surgery and the transplant will be scheduled at time appropriate to both you and the recipie

 

U of U Hospital employee receives kidney donation from Nephrologist brother-in-law from Wisconsin

    April 16th, 2014

http://centralwisconsinhub.wausaudailyherald.com/article/20140314/WDH0101/303140282/Marshfield-Clinic-nephrologist-donates-kidney

steve perry and bob haw

 

MARSHFIELD — Marshfield Clinic pediatric nephrologist Dr. Bob Haws has counseled families about kidney donation for years in his medical practice. Since becoming a kidney donor himself, Haws said he can now speak from experience about making a life-saving gift.

Haws had supported and counseled his brother-in-law, Steve Perry of Salt Lake City, for years while Perry battled kidney disease, but when Haws learned in March 2011 Perry would soon need dialysis, he started the donor evaluation process.

“I felt a spiritual drive, that this is what God would want me to do,” Haws said.

He said Perry might have had to wait two to seven years for a transplant, a time period many patients with kidney disease don’t survive.

After undergoing blood tests and human leukocyte antigen tests, Haws learned he was a three out of six match with Perry — a very compatible match usually seen between parents and children. The transplant surgeries were scheduled for Oct. 11, 2013, at the University of Utah Hospital where Haws had attended medical school.

“It really came out of the blue when he said he wanted to donate,” Perry said. “When I married his younger sister 40 years ago, if someone had told me he’d be giving me a kidney, I’d have laughed them out of the room, but things have a way of changing.

“There’s really no way to tell how much gratitude there is,” he said.

Perry’s quality of life has improved dramatically since the transplant. Before receiving his kidney disease diagnosis, he regularly bicycled up to 100 miles in a single weekend. A month before the transplant, he struggled through a 5K walk for the National Kidney Foundation and would become fatigued doing his job repairing medical equipment.

Perry returned to work about three and a half months ago and said he’s looking forward to participating in cycling events with this son this summer.

Haws’ recovery also went smoothly — he was out of the hospital in three days and back to work in seven.

“It’s not as big a deal as I always thought,” he said. “I can still go skiing and do normal things.”

Haws said becoming a donor has made him feel closer to parent donors and has helped him counsel them through the process. Many potential donors fear having only one kidney will impact their energy levels, ability to work or ability to have children, he said.

“I tell (potential donors) the anxiety about donating a kidney shouldn’t be there, but now I can speak with authority about it and be more sincere when talking to parents,” Haws said. “I want people to know donation is a wonderful, loving act of kindness.”